Joe’s Cleaners Tips to Improve Video Effective environmental protection

 

 

Today’s ‘organic’ products are called so in a substantially different meaning than just being simply organic in a traditional sense. Specifically, ‘organic’ is used to refer to a thing made from completely natural non-toxic materials and process without any artificial stuff harmful to human body and environment, additives, supplements, and processes.

Non-toxic.

The cleaned textiles have a fresh scent.

Excellent cleaning power for water-soluble and lipophilic statins.

Gentle cleaning of textiles, leather, and furs.

Very pleasant and smooth feel.

High wearing comfort.

Bright colors.

Increased protection against textiles

Effective environmental protection. Well thought out – Solvon K4 for a sustainable future: We take over responsibility – for the protection of human health and our environment. That is why all components of K4 Systems in such a way that they fulfill stringent, statutory environmental regulations

What is Wet Cleaning? From Joe’s Organic Cleaners

What is Wet Cleaning?

Wet cleaning is widely considered as the next generation of traditional dry cleaning. It is a non-toxic, environmentally safe alternative to dry cleaning.

It utilizes computer-controlled washing machines, biodegradable soaps , and conditioners, and finishes the drying process by using special moisture sensitive dryers.  Wet cleaning is not the same as laundry, and is perfect for using on any garment such as silk, cashmere, woolens, and other fine delicates. Wet cleaning uses water, a universal solvent and does not use hazardous chemicals, generate harmful wastes, or contribute pollution.  For more information on wet cleaning, please visit the EPA’s website.

Why Choose Wet Cleaning?

Traditional dry cleaners utilize perchloroethylene, a toxic solvent commonly known as “perc.” This chemical is used throughout many cycles of dry cleaning and can be very harmful to the environment if not disposed of properly. It is 1.5 times heavier than water and requires extreme temperatures to be completely removed from one’s clothing.

Dry Cleaners that generically advertise not using for ‘greener,’ or natural’ solvent, are usually referring to one of the chemicals K4. Although less toxic than perc, these are chemicals normally found in gasoline for automobiles. Wet cleaning, on the other hand, uses NO CHEMICALS and is different because it refers to a truly eco-friendly way of cleaning one’s garments and textiles. This method of cleaning is not only safe for the environment but to our body as well.

Benefits of Wet Cleaning

  • Soft to the Touch
  • No Chemical Odors and No Residue
  • Gentler than Hand Washing
  • Fresh, Clean Scent
  • Kind to Sensitive Skin
  • Safe for your Clothing
  • Better for Removing Stains
  • Milder than Home Laundry Products
  • Brighter, Vibrant Colors Without Fading
  • Whiter Whites
  • Gentle on the Environment

SPECIALIST DRY CLEANERS IN WESTBURY Let Us Introduce Ourselves

We Start with a New Organic Dry cleaning Systems. We put in a new type of dry cleaning machine that uses non-toxic K4 Systems.

These non-toxic SolvonK4 are actually We take over responsibility – For the protection of human health and our environment.

Our specialty services include Hand Finished Shirts, Wedding Gown Preservation, Cocktail Dress cleaning, Household items.

We understand the increasing demands of modern life and to help assist we provide a local pickup and delivery service for your convenience.

Give us a try, we guarantee full satisfaction. Call us at (516)-334-3350 or contact us to setup an account. Our representative will assist you immediately.

 

Returning to the topic of bio-based chemistry, is this a better choice?

In the crowded field of alternative dry cleaning solvents, the answer is yes with an understanding that moving from compounds derived from petroleum to compounds derived from corn is one small step in a sustainable and safer industry.  The process for converting corn to SOLVONK4 [the solvent at the heart of the SYSTEMK4 dry cleaning system] is clean, low energy, and safe. Much of the corn waste is returned to the fields and farms as compost and feed and the final product is as pure and stable as it was when we first introduced SYSTEMK4 nearly ten years ago. By making this change with our bio-based formula, we’ve lowered the carbon footprint for SOLVONK4, reduced the dependency on petroleum-derived feedstocks without changing any of the attributes of the final product. We won’t stop here on our quest to create more sustainable, useful products for our clients but we’re proud of where we’re heading.

Some additional resources:

What are Bio-Based Solvents?

What is Siloxane?

What is the USDA Bio-Preferred program

Learn about Man-Made Deforestation and it’s effects on the planet

local upscale boutiques where they refer their customers for alterations.”

Work with a reliable tailor.

“The first step to finding a good tailor is to ask around. Ask men and women who are well-dressed. If they look good on it, they will probably fit their stuff. Please contact your local luxury boutique to contact the customer for a change. ”

Expect conversation

“You need to be able to put on your sewing costume and check your suitability. Make sure you can deliver the finished garments exactly as you want. The tailor should be able to communicate with you appropriately, explain how the changes can get you what you want, and explain if they can do it successfully. Fix and mark the necessary adjustments. ”

Look for your suitability.

“Ignore the size! Find the one that fits your widest body part, then fit everything else.
“All women, especially women with large breasts, should not reduce the size of their shirts too small to fit the waistline. You almost always want a garment to outline your waist but achieve it through sewing.
“The length of the most flattering skirt or cropped pants is always hem to the point where the legs start tapering, regardless of mini, knee, midi or ankle length.
“The pants must fit well in the ass. They have to match the height of the shoes you can wear. The bottom pants have a slight gap on the front and no more than 1/2 inch from the floor at the back. This will create a lean vision.

How to Choice Wash or Dry Cleaning Dress Shirt

Method 1: “Wash and press” at the cleaners

Wash and press is the “normal” way to clean dress shirts when you take them to the cleaners. (Don’t be too confused by this.  Even though you take your shirt to the “dry-cleaners”, they are most likely doing wash and press unless you are expressly asking them to dry clean ). This is our first choice. At around $1.50/shirt, this cleaning method is relatively cheap and easy and it keeps the shirts looking great.  At most cleaners, here’s what the process involves:

Shirts are made to be worn, not worshiped. This means they get dirty. However, with proper care, a high quality dress shirt can last for several years and continue to look great. In this post, we’re going to break down three of the most popular washing methods and detail how you can keep your dress shirts looking great for years to come. We’ll also outline how to deal with special emergencies as well as provide some other cleaning tips.

  1. They wash your shirt in a normal washing machine using water and detergent.
  2. They remove most of the water from the shirt with the spin cycle in the washing machine.
  3. They pull the damp shirt onto an industrial shirt press that closes over the shirt and simultaneously irons the garment while removing all of the moisture.

Pros: Convenient, (relatively) inexpensive.

Cons: Some cleaners will be too hard on the shirts.  The slamming of the press over the front of the shirt can cause  buttons to chip or shatter. If the shirt torso or sleeve is stretched over the press when it is steamed dry it can cause this part of the shirt to become wider in these areas.  Finally, in the process of bringing the shirts from the cleaners to your closet collars will often be smashed in some way, requiring additional ironing for optimal appearance.

How to Wash a Dress Shirt

Method 2: Wash the shirt yourself at home

If you don’t trust your dry cleaner, or if you’d just like a little more control over how your shirts are washed, you may want to wash your dress shirts at home.  We really like this option, but to do so properly requires a bit of time and care on your part. Follow these steps for optimal results:

  1. Start by preparing the dress shirt.  Unbutton all of the buttons, including cuff buttons and any collar buttons.  Remove any collar stays if it has them and put them in a safe place.
  2. Pre-treat any stains by carefully working a little detergent into them, or better yet spot-cleaning them with a stain remover pen.
  3. Set up your washing machine: To minimize wear on a fine or lightweight dress shirt, use the Delicate cycle.  If the shirt is made from a heavier duty fabric, or is particularly dirty you may opt for the Normal cycle.  Whites and light colors can use hot water.  Dark colored shirts that you don’t want to fade should be washed with cold water. Take care not to include other laundry items with bold colors that may bleed into your shirts.
  4. Use a high quality detergent, like Woolite Complete, that is appropriate to the color of the shirt.  Be sure not to use any detergents or cleaners that are chlorine based as these will cause discoloration to many shirt fabrics.
  5. Wash the shirts in the washing machine, and then let the spin cycle wring most of the water out of the garment.
  6. The shirts will be tightly crumpled in the washing machine so you’ll want to remove them promptly before these intense wrinkles will dry into the shirt. Hang the shirts up or lay them out so that they can air dry.  Be careful about hanging the shirts on a sharp hanger or with tight clothespins as this can distort the fabric or leave a mark on the shirt.
  7. Next you’ll want to iron the shirts.  You don’t need to wait for the shirts to be completely dry to begin this step, but they should be mostly dry.

Pros: Gives you the most control to treat stains, protect buttons, and iron collars carefully.

Cons: Takes time and attention.

How to dry cleaning a Dress Shirt

Method 3: “Dry clean” at the cleaners

While we don’t really recommend dry cleaning cotton dress shirts, some folks like to take their shirts to the cleaners and have them dry cleaned. While this cleaning method will certainly not damage the shirt and minimize shrinkage, it does have some downsides. The first is that it can be expensive – usually over $5/shirt. Another is that water soluble stains such as perspiration are not removed. Dry cleaning solvents contain very little to no water so perspiration based dirt can be left untouched.  Washing dress shirts in water is better for removing water soluble dirt and stains from sweat.  That said, if your dress shirt has an oil based stain on it you may have better luck getting it cleaned by a dry cleaner than in a washing machine.

Pros: Convenient.  Minimizes wear of the shirts.  Removes oil-based stains.

Cons: Won’t always remove water soluble dirt or stains. Expensive. Your shirts are at the mercy of a potentially abusive shirt cleaner.

Question: Is it ok to dry shirts in the dryer?

We recommend avoiding the dryer and letting the shirt air dry on a hanger, although (depending on the size of your house) this is not always practical. If you must put the shirt in a dryer, avoid high heat or over-drying the shirt. Use the dryer to get most of the moisture out of the shirt, and then iron the shirt immediately to remove the rest of the moisture and any wrinkles at the same time.  If you dry your shirts completely in the dryer you’ll find the shirt a bit harder to iron perfectly, and they will likely shrink beyond Proper Cloth’s calculated shrinkage allowances.

Question: How to remove a stain from a white shirt?

In the unfortunate event that you get spill some wine or spaghetti sauce on your shirt, some quick action could minimize any stains that result.

  1. With a brush or comb, carefully swipe or lift away any large pieces such that you don’t smear them worse into the garment. 
  2. Immediately treat the stain with water or stain remover solvent.  The sooner the better.  If you can’t get your hands on a stain remover pen, we recommend a Tide Pen, try dishwashing detergent, lemon juice, vinegar, or seltzer water. 
  3. Dab solvents on the stain with a light touch. Pressure can force the stain deeper into the fibers of the garment. 
  4. Rinse and repeat. 

Question: Should I use starch when the shirt is pressed?

While many people do like to have their shirts starched, our suggestion is to avoid starch completely.  While starch can help a broadcloth or oxford shirt appear more crisp it can also cause shirts to wear out prematurely.  When the starch material gets embedded in the shirt fibers it acts like a million little knives that break down the fibers over time.

Three tips to maximize dress shirt life

  1. Don’t leave dirty white shirts in the hamper for too long before washing. This can lead to premature yellowing of the collar band as any sweat and oils will have more time to set into the fabric of the shirt.
  2. Always remove the collar stays from the collar before washing and ironing.  If you don’t they will become warped causing the dress shirt collar points to curve awkwardly.
  3. Don’t count on your cleaner to find and remove stains. If you know there’s a spot on your placket or sleeve, point it out so that they know to spot clean it.

Tailor Sewing Tips – When you step into your favorite jeans, there are a lot of things you might consider

How comfy they are, how great they look, and what shoes you’ll pair with them, to name a few.

But unless you’re a hardcore denimhead, there are likely a few important components of your favorite pair that you don’t always think about.

Below, we list the often forgotten parts of the pant that make your Levi’s® special.

Rivets
In 1871, Latvian immigrant Jacob Davis pioneered rivets while working as a tailor in Reno, Nev. Davis had originally used rivets on horse blankets, and he found they worked well for re-enforcing the stress point in men’s work trousers—particularly the corners of the back pockets and the crotch, which often tore apart when exposed to heavy duty wear and tear.

Rivet

The rivet

Since Davis did not have the money required to patent the technique of using rivets, he reached out to Levi Strauss to see if he was interested in applying with him. In 1873, the pair received a patent for “improvement in fastening pocket-openings.” This was the birth of what we now know as the blue jean. Today, rivets continue to strengthen and reinforce the most vulnerable parts of our jeans.

It’s worth noting that Levi Strauss & Co. was the first company to make riveted pants, creating a new category of workwear.

Crotch Seam
In pattern making, sewing and fitting, the crotch seam is said to be the most challenging construction element of a pair of pants.

Crotch Seam

The crotch seam

Pattern makers use two important measurements to draft the curves that compose the crotch seam: crotch length and crotch depth. Crotch depth is determined by having a fit model sit in a chair, and then measuring the distance from their waistline to the seat. Crotch length is the distance from the top center front of the pants around to the top center back of the pants.

There’s a large amount of room for variation in the resulting curves with lots of potential for error, yet the shapes are essential components in obtaining the perfect fit.

Selvedge
If you’re a denimhead, surely you know all about the selvedge.  For everyone else, what’s all the hype about?

The word selvedge refers to the tightly finished edge of any fabric when it comes off of the loom. Looms in the 1800s produced strips of denim that were long and narrow. To use the entire width of the fabric, the fabric’s edge, or “self-edge” was used as the side seam of the pant.  This was efficient, and it also made the side seam inherently immune to fraying and unraveling.

Selvage

Selvedge

Today, the vintage looms and narrow fabric widths required for production make selvedge jeans rarer and more expensive than jeans that finish with an overlock stitch at the side seams.

The Watch Pocket
The first blue jeans had four pockets—only one in back and, in the front, two plus the small, watch pocket. Originally included as protection for pocket watches, thus the name, this extra pouch has served many functions, evident in its many titles: frontier pocket, condom pocket, coin pocket, match pocket and ticket pocket, to name a few.

Watch Pocket

Watch pocket

Not only is the pocket extremely useful for holding tiny trinkets, it is also is loved by denimheads for the faded and worn nature it takes on over time.

Twill
Why is the inside of your jeans white and the outside blue? That’s due to the twill weave of your jeans.

Technically, a twill weave occurs when filling or “weft” threads (often white) are woven over and then under two or more “warp” yarns (often blue). This produces a subtle diagonal pattern across the weave and makes the warp yarns predominate on the face of the fabric and the weft yarns show more on the back.

Twill

Twill

In “right hand twill” the diagonal lines of the twill run from the lower left corner of the fabric to the upper right corner. Made from yarn that is spun counterclockwise, right hand twill is known for creating crisper and more defined fades than other versions, such as left hand twill and broken twill. Right hand twill was also the first weave purchased by Levi Strauss to make the original pair of Levi’s.

Stitches
Bartack is a stitch that you might not have noticed on your denim. It looks like a line of short and close together stitches, used to reinforce jeans in places where they are most stressed during wear. Bartacks are usually seen around flies, crotch seams and pocket openings.  These strong stiches are essentially a series of small zigzag stitches. In production, there is a special machine that makes this durable stitch.

Bartack

Bartack

Hems can be sewn with both a chain stitch and a lock stitch. Chain stitches allow the hem to twist and roll in a particular way after washing. This is called “roping.”

Chain Stitch

Chain stitch

However, the lock stitch has advantages of being stronger and less prone to unraveling.

Lock Stitch

Lock stitch

Thread
And what about thread color? The orange thread used on the original Levi’s has now become an industry standard. Legend has it that Jacob Davis originally insisted that the thread be orange to match the jean’s copper rivets. But we don’t know that to be fact. Many Levi Strauss & Co. records were lost in the 1906 earthquake and fire, so, as a result, we really don’t know why orange thread was chosen.

Thread on Arcuate

Thread color, as seen on a Levi’s® arcuate.

The more there is to know about your jeans, the more there is to love about them. Next time you step into your favorite pair of Levi’s, take extra notice of these special details.

From – http://www.levistrauss.com/unzipped-blog/2014/04/17/those-oft-forgotten-pant-parts/

Returning to the topic of bio-based chemistry, is this a better choice?

 In the crowded field of alternative dry cleaning solvents, the answer is yes with an understanding that moving from compounds derived from petroleum to compounds derived from corn is one small step in a sustainable and safer industry.  The process for converting corn to SOLVONK4 [the solvent at the heart of the SYSTEMK4 dry cleaning system] is clean, low energy, and safe. Much of the corn waste is returned to the fields and farms as compost and feed and the final product is as pure and stable as it was when we first introduced SYSTEMK4 nearly ten years ago. By making this change with our bio-based formula, we’ve lowered the carbon footprint for SOLVONK4, reduced the dependency on petroleum-derived feedstocks without changing any of the attributes of the final product. We won’t stop here on our quest to create more sustainable, useful products for our clients but we’re proud of where we’re heading.

Some additional resources:

What are Bio-Based Solvents?

What is Siloxane?

What is the USDA Bio-Preferred program

Learn about Man-Made Deforestation and it’s effects on the planet